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Jan 15 2020

#Minnesota ~ #Video

#Welcome #to #the #Minnesota #State #High #School #League!



Minnesota

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Class A
Thursday, March 21
Quarterfinals, at Williams Arena

Spring Grove 78, No. 1 Springfield 67
No. 4 Henning 63, No. 5 Christ’s Household of Faith 56
No. 2 Ada-Borup 49, Cromwell-Wright 39
No. 3 North Woods 56, Westbrook-Walnut Grove 39
Friday, March 22
Consolation semifinals, at Concordia (St. Paul)

Springfield 95, Christ’s Household of Faith 73
Westbrook-Walnut Grove 70, Cromwell-Wright 57
Championship semifinals
At Target Center, Minneapolis

Henning 67, Spring Grove 34
North Woods 57, Ada-Borup 55
Saturday, March 23
Consolation final, at Concordia (St. Paul)

Springfield 91, Westbrook-Walnut Grove 61
Third place, at Concordia (St. Paul)
Spring Grove 72, Ada-Borup 68 OT
Championship, at Target Center, Minneapolis
Henning 67, North Woods 42
Class AA
Wednesday, March 20
Quarterfinals
At Target Center, Minneapolis

No. 1 Minnehaha Academy 78, St. Peter 47
No. 5 Lake City 60, No. 4 Melrose Area 44
At Williams Arena, Minneapolis
No. 2 Minneapolis North 61, Esko 53
No. 3 Perham 73, Redwood Valley 58
Thursday, March 21
Consolation semifinals, at Concordia (St. Paul)

Melrose Area 58, St. Peter 53
Esko 66, Redwood Valley 56
Friday, March 22
Consolation final, at Concordia (St. Paul)

Melrose Area 66, Esko 57
Championship semifinals, at Target Center, Minneapolis
Minnehaha Academy 82, Lake City 52
Minneapolis North 62, Perham 46
Saturday, March 23
Third place, at Concordia (St. Paul)

Lake City 51, Perham 47
Championship
Minnehaha Academy 69, Minneapolis North 52
Class AAA
Wednesday, March 20
Quarterfinals, at Williams Arena, Minneapolis

No. 1 DeLaSalle 76, Bemidji 45
No. 4 Princeton 68, No. 5 Mahtomedi 63
No. 2 Waseca 82, Holy Angels 62
No. 3 Austin 68, Monticello 52
Thursday, March 21
Consolation semifinals, at Concordia (St. Paul)

Mahtomedi 87, Bemidji 49
Holy Angels 71, Monticello 65
Championship semifinals, at Target Center, Minneapolis
DeLaSalle 93, Princeton 54
Waseca 79, Austin 69
Friday, March 22
Consolation final, at Concordia (St. Paul)

Holy Angels 80, Mahtomedi 73
Saturday, March 23
Third place, at Concordia (St. Paul)

Austin 88, Princeton 76
Championship, at Target Center, Minneapolis
DeLaSalle 63, Waseca 56
Class AAAA
Wednesday, March 20
Quarterfinals, at Target Center, Minneapolis

No. 1 Park Center 77, Maple Grove 56
No. 5 Lakeville North 73, No. 4 Eden Prairie 48
No. 2 Hopkins 86, Cambridge-Isanti 53
No. 3 East Ridge 78, Eastview 41
Thursday, March 21
Consolation semifinals, at Concordia (St. Paul)

Eden Prairie 77, Maple Grove 74
Eastview 85, Cambridge-Isanti 78
Championship semifinals, at Target Center, Minneapolis
Lakeville North 47, Park Center 45
Hopkins 71, East Ridge 47
Friday, March 22
Consolation final, at Concordia (St. Paul)

Eden Prairie 76, Eastview 65
Saturday, March 23
Third place, at Concordia (St. Paul)

Park Center 61, East Ridge 59
Championship, at Target Center, Minneapolis
Hopkins 55, Lakeville North 40

While watching the NCAA basketball tournament on Friday evening, I flipped between games involving Duke and Kentucky. As this happened, I Tweeted the following: “Kinda cool to flip from Duke/Tre Jones to Kentucky/Reid Travis. Minnesota: State of Basketball.”

Tre Jones, like his big brother Tyus, was a high school athlete at Apple Valley before playing at Duke. Reid Travis was a star at DeLaSalle High School before playing at Stanford and now Kentucky. As I write this, I’m watching Gonzaga play Texas Tech in the tournament; another DeLaSalle grad, Geno Crandall, plays for Gonzaga.

Minnesota is a state of hockey, a state of basketball, football, baseball, you name it. Minnesotans are a proud lot, whether that pride is focused on our lakes and rivers, our forests and other natural areas, our wonderful lifestyle or our athletes.

“Our” athletes are the focus of a terrific book published recently. It’s titled “Minnesota Made Me” and it’s the perfect embodiment of the pride Minnesotans take in our favorite home-grown athletes. Thirty-eight individuals are profiled in the book, written by Pat Borzi, a longtime Minnesota journalist. The foreward is written by Sid Hartman, the 99-year-old sports columnist from the Minneapolis Star Tribune whose byline first appeared in 1945.

Pat and I have something in common: Neither of us are Minnesota natives. I grew up in an Iowa town about 20 miles south of the Minnesota state line, so I like to claim that I’m an honorary native of this great state. Pat is an East Coast guy who worked at newspapers in Maine, Florida, New York and New Jersey before moving to Minnesota for love; he is married to veteran Minneapolis Star Tribune sports reporter Rachel Blount, a romance that blossomed from their time covering several Olympics together. They are the finest people I know.

Pat is a noted freelance sports reporter, contributing to MinnPost and covering the midwestern American sporting scene for The New York Times. He’s lived in this state for nearly 20 years and has come to know many of Minnesota’s highest-level athletes. In this book, he tells their stories. I learned a lot.

For example, I always knew that Matt Birk had played football and earned a degree at Harvard. But I didn’t know that his decision to say yes to an offer from Harvard was a yes-or-go-home thing. Birk visited the campus the very day the football coach had to submit his list of recruits to the admissions office, so he asked Birk point-blank if he was in. The book quotes Birk, “And I said, ‘If I get into Harvard, I’ll come.’ And I did.”

In Birk’s senior year, he thrived under first-year offensive line coach Joe Philbin (a future NFL head coach). That single season helped catapult Birk to a long NFL career with the Vikings and Baltimore Ravens.

I have known Twins broadcaster Dick Bremer for many years from my time covering the team as a newspaper reporter. I knew he had grown up in the little Minnesota hamlet of Dumont. I learned in “Minnesota Made Me” that Dick was adopted, for which he is clearly grateful.

If there is a theme that runs throughout the profiles in the book, it can be summed up by a comment from Bremer: “For work ethic, the one thing I took from my parents and the people I was surrounded by in Dumont was, if you commit yourself to something, then it is a commitment – you see it through to the end, and you devote yourself to that particular challenge.”

Many of the athletes profiled in the book are very familiar names: Lindsay Whalen, Adam Thielen, Tyus Jones, Herb Brooks and others. But Borzi didn’t just write about current athletes who everybody knows so well. He goes back in time with chapters about golf legend Patty Berg and 1941 Heisman Trophy winner Bruce Smith, as well as soccer stars Tony Sanneh and Briana Scurry, Olympic curling champion John Shuster and others.

The profiles are in alphabetic order, beginning with Patty Berg and ending with Lindsay Whalen. Those are two fine bookends to this project; Berg was born in 1918 and we all know almost everything about Whalen.

Whalen, the basketball legend whose playing career wound from Hutchinson High School to the University of Minnesota to the WNBA and the Olympics, is now the Gophers women’s basketball coach. After graduating from high school and before starting college, Whalen worked a summer job on a 3M assembly line in Hutchinson; that’s where her father was employed for many years.

One morning at 5 a.m., facing a 12-hour shift that would start at 6 a.m., a young, tired Lindsay begged her dad to let her skip work that day and go back to bed. Her father insisted that they were both going to work. She asked, “You can’t just tell my boss I couldn’t sleep (all night)?” He answered, “No. If you want to get fired, that’s your deal. We’re going to work.”

Borzi writes … “It taught Whalen about responsibility and accountability, lessons she still brings to everything she does; Do your best. No griping. No excuses. And most important, never disappoint those relying on you.”

Responsibility. Accountability. No excuses. Hard work. Those words provide an underlying theme to everything that’s great about Minnesota. And “Minnesota Made Me” is now part of that greatness.

–Follow John on Twitter @MSHSLjohn, listen to “Preps Today with John Millea” wherever you get podcasts and hear him on Minnesota Public Radio.


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SOURCE: http://www.mshsl.org/mshsl/index.asp

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